Plato

Plato

Plato (428/427 or 424/423 – 348/347 BCE) was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. He is widely considered the most pivotal figure in the development of philosophy, especially the Western tradition. Unlike nearly all of his philosophical contemporaries, Plato's entire work is believed to have survived intact for over 2,400 years.

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No trace of slavery ought to mix with the studies of the freeborn man. No study pursued under compulsion remains rooted in the memory.

A state arises as I conceive out of the needs of mankind, no one is self-sufficing but all of us have many wants.

This City is what it is because our citizens are what they are.

Wise men speak because they have something to say, Fools because they have to say something.

It is clear to everyone that astronomy at all events compels the soul to look upwards and draws it from the things of this world to the other.

They do certainly give very strange and newfangled names to diseases.

A good decision is based on knowledge and not on numbers.

He who steals a little steals with the same wish as he who steals much but with less power.

All men are by nature equal, made all of the same earth by one Workman, and however we deceive ourselves, as dear unto God is the poor peasant as the mighty prince.

There is no harm in repeating a good thing.

There is no such thing as a lovers' oath.

Justice means minding one's own business and not meddling with other men's concerns.

Dictatorship naturally arises out of democracy and the most aggravated form of tyranny and slavery out of the most extreme liberty.

The greatest wealth is to live content with little.

To prefer evil to good is not in human nature, and when a man is compelled to choose one of two evils no one will choose the greater when he might have the less.

Poets utter great and wise things which they do not themselves understand.

I shall assume that your silence gives consent.

There's a victory and defeat, the first and best of victories the lowest and worst of defeats which each man gains or sustains at the hands not of another but of himself.

Nothing in the affairs of men is worthy of great anxiety.

There will be no end to the troubles of states, or of humanity itself, till philosophers become kings in this world, or till those we now call kings and rulers really and truly become philosophers and political power, and philosophy thus come into the same hands.

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