The writer's greed is appalling. He wants or seems to want everything and practically everybody in another sense and at the same time he needs no one at all.

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Explore More Quotes by James Arthur Baldwin

Nobody is more dangerous than he who imagines himself pure in heart, for his purity by definition i

Nobody is more dangerous than he who imagines himself pure in heart, for his purity by definition is unassailable.

The paradox of education is precisely this - that as one begins to become conscious one begins to e

The paradox of education is precisely this - that as one begins to become conscious ,one begins to examine the society in which he is being educated.

I imagine one of the reasons people cling to their hates so stubbornly is because they sense once h

I imagine one of the reasons people cling to their hates so stubbornly is because they sense once hate is gone they will be forced to deal with pain.

American history is longer larger more various more beautiful and more terrible than anything anyon

American history is longer, larger, more various, more beautiful and more terrible than anything anyone has ever said about it.

Related Quotes to Explore

    For the born traveller, travelling is a besetting vice. Like other vices, it is imperious, demanding its victim’s time, money, energy and the sacrifice of comfort.

    For the born traveller, travelling is a besetting vice. Like other vices, it is imperious, demanding its victim’s time, money, energy and the sacrifice of comfort.

    When you are missing someone, time seems to move slower, and when I’m falling in love with someone, time seems to be moving faster.

    When you are missing someone, time seems to move slower, and when I’m falling in love with someone, time seems to be moving faster.

    The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

    The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

    We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infintesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future.

    We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infinitesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. 

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