The man for whom time stretches out painfully is one waiting in vain disappointed at not finding tomorrow already continuing yesterday.

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Explore More Quotes by Theodor W. Adorno

Only a humanity to whom death has become as indifferent as its members that has itself died can inf

Only a humanity to whom death has become as indifferent as its members, that has itself died, can inflict it administratively on innumerable people.

For a man who no longer has a homeland writing becomes a place to live.

For a man who no longer has a homeland, writing becomes a place to live.

The hardest hit as everywhere are those who have no choice.

The hardest hit, as everywhere, are those who have no choice.

Exuberant health is always as such sickness also.

Exuberant health is always as such sickness also.

Related Quotes to Explore

    For the born traveller, travelling is a besetting vice. Like other vices, it is imperious, demanding its victim’s time, money, energy and the sacrifice of comfort.

    For the born traveller, travelling is a besetting vice. Like other vices, it is imperious, demanding its victim’s time, money, energy and the sacrifice of comfort.

    When you are missing someone, time seems to move slower, and when I’m falling in love with someone, time seems to be moving faster.

    When you are missing someone, time seems to move slower, and when I’m falling in love with someone, time seems to be moving faster.

    The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

    The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

    We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infintesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future.

    We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infinitesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. 

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