The best time I ever had with Joan Crawford was when I pushed her down the stairs in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

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Explore More Quotes by Bette Davis

If you've never been hated by your child you've never been a parent.

If you've never been hated by your child, you've never been a parent.

Sex is God's joke on human beings.

Sex is God's joke on human beings.

I do not regret one professional enemy I have made. Any actor who doesn't dare to make an enemy sho

I do not regret one professional enemy I have made. Any actor who doesn't dare to make an enemy should get out of the business.

From the moment I was six I felt sexy. And let me tell you it was hell sheer hell waiting to do som

From the moment I was six I felt sexy. And let me tell you it was hell, sheer hell, waiting to do something about it.

Related Quotes to Explore

    For the born traveller, travelling is a besetting vice. Like other vices, it is imperious, demanding its victim’s time, money, energy and the sacrifice of comfort.

    For the born traveller, travelling is a besetting vice. Like other vices, it is imperious, demanding its victim’s time, money, energy and the sacrifice of comfort.

    When you are missing someone, time seems to move slower, and when I’m falling in love with someone, time seems to be moving faster.

    When you are missing someone, time seems to move slower, and when I’m falling in love with someone, time seems to be moving faster.

    The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

    The greatest loss of time is delay and expectation, which depend upon the future. We let go the present, which we have in our power, and look forward to that which depends upon chance, and so relinquish a certainty for an uncertainty.

    We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infintesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future.

    We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infinitesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. 

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